Angel Island Hike

Angel Island is a small island in San Francisco Bay (Wikipedia article) with beautiful views and a ton of history.

A couple of weeks ago, Nick and I decided to take advantage of the beautiful weather we’ve been having in the Bay Area and go for a long hike on Angel Island. You can get there on a ferry from Tiburon or San Francisco for about $13 a person. We opted for Tiburon as we thought the parking would be cheaper and more plentiful.

Tiburon ferry entrance
Tiburon ferry entrance
Me on the ferry, with the Golden Gate bridge in the background.
Me on the ferry, with the Golden Gate bridge in the background.

Knowing that the weather around SF can be a little unpredictable, especially on an island, we brought toques (known as “beanies” here in the states), mittens, and sweaters. I was glad to have them on the boat, but shortly into our hike we were able to get rid of just about every extra layer of clothing. It was such a beautiful day – sunny, not a cloud in the sky, and about 75F / 23C.

At the start - Nick still had his sweater on but I'd long since gotten too warm.
At the start – Nick still had his sweater on but I’d long since gotten too warm.
Deer, just a few minutes into the hike.
Deer, just a few minutes into the hike.

We originally had set out with the intention of looping the entire island twice, counter-clockwise on the external loop called Perimeter Rd, and then the other way round on the higher-up loop called Fire Rd. However, by the time we got to Fort McDowell, we knew we wouldn’t have time, so we opted to make the climb to Mt Livermore (highest point on the island) and cross back to Ayala Cove, where the boat would pick us up to take us home.

Our actual route was the line I traced with purple marker (you may need to click to zoom in).
Our actual route was the line I traced with purple marker (you may need to click to zoom in).

We were rewarded again and again with stunning views and interesting history of the island, which had functioned as a military base and an immigration waypoint. I’ll let the photos speak for themselves!

Stunning views.
Stunning views.
Nick taking a picture.
Nick taking a picture.
Defending the Bay.
Defending the Bay.
Angel Island was used as a Nike Missile Station during the Cold War.
Angel Island was used as a Nike Missile Station during the Cold War.
The sign reads: "This brick hospital, built in 1904, was the third hospital to be built for Camp Reynolds. The Army located hospital treating ill or injured soldiers away from buildings housing healthy troops to prevent the spread of disease and fear."
The sign reads: “This brick hospital, built in 1904, was the third hospital to be built for Camp Reynolds. The Army located hospital treating ill or injured soldiers away from buildings housing healthy troops to prevent the spread of disease and fear.”
This sign is the "Cold War Defense" sign above.
This sign is the “Cold War Defense” sign above.
This building was originally a hospital and then became a barracks. We could see the caduceus behind the crossed weapons sign they put up.
This building was originally a hospital and then became a barracks. We could see the caduceus behind the crossed weapons sign they put up.
Spraypainted art inside one of the buildings we explored.
Spraypainted art inside one of the buildings we explored.
Nick standing where a gun was located in Battery Drew
Nick standing where a gun was located in Battery Drew
The view from the top of Mt Livermore!
The view from the top of Mt Livermore!
At the top!
At the top!
On our way back down - can't get enough of that ocean.
On our way back down – can’t get enough of that ocean.

We’d definitely go back to Angel Island for another hike or perhaps even on a camping trip – you can backpack in and stay for up to a week.

After we returned from our hike, exhausted, we stopped on the pier in adorable Tiburon for a well-deserved glass of wine and a rest before the drive home, and were able to even watch the seals playing in the harbour.

Cute Tiburon harbour
Cute Tiburon harbour
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s